Economics

Firm Exit Now Exceeds Firm Entry. That’s a Problem.

For the first time in US history, the rate of firm exit exceeds the rate of firm entry. The new trend represents a shift in our economic structure towards entrenched industries instead of “creative destruction” – or the process by which more productive firms drive out less productive ones through competition. Our economy becomes less competitive when entrepreneurial growth slows. (more…)

Government does not “Approve” Capitalism

Detractors of capitalism often blame the market for government. I mean, it couldn’t be any more obvious here. The government (FDA) “approved” a product (cigarettes), which is now sold in a highly regulated market. It must be capitalism’s fault. You know, how leftists claim that “deregulation” has been a problem, and then go blame capitalism for regulations.

It really doesn’t make any sense how they’ve reached this conclusion. Somehow, deregulation equals regulation. More FDA should fix that. (more…)

Always Think Past Stage One: Everything has Costs!

Today’s lesson in economics: Everything has costs and costs affect prices!

Noble intentions always begin somewhere in the political sphere. At face value, they sound great. Who wouldn’t support feeding the homeless? Every noble endeavor, however, does not come cost-free and we must consider those costs to fully understand the issue. (more…)

Does “Trophy Hunting” Reduce Wildlife Populations?

The hunting death of a lion sparked me to do some research on the economics of trophy hunting. You can still morally oppose trophy hunting (that’s your opinion), but there are objective economics of it. If the ultimate goal of conservation is to increase wildlife populations, then the trends of populations before and after trophy hunting are worth considering. My findings coincide with the economics of any valuable resource: for-profit privatization affects supply via a market price. (more…)

Here’s Why US Manufacturing is NOT Dying

You often hear people talk about how the United States does not produce anything because manufacturing was taken over by China. Although some manufacturing has left the United States, it has been replaced with more specialized manufacturing and new industries. Furthermore, there are foreign companies with manufacturing operations in the United States because of the access to a larger pool of highly qualified employees. (more…)

Understanding the Impact of Regulatory Burden

We often hear political groups advocate for economic regulations to address an externality or “protect” some group – usually consumers and labor. They only consider the initial and visible outcomes with little or no regard for the secondary and indirect consequences. At the same time, they fear America’s “unregulated capitalism”.

It is often thought that without regulation, corporations MIGHT carry out destructive acts that result in social externalities. Many of these regulations are crafted on the grounds of what MIGHT happen, as opposed to what has happened. Net neutrality is an excellent example. (more…)

The Case for Legalizing Child Labor

CHILD LABOR is one of the more controversial topics in economics. At face value, most people probably support restricting or banning it. Understandably, child labor evokes emotional responses and images of horrendous working conditions of the Industrial Revolution. Times have changed, however, and this discussion is worth revisiting. (more…)

Does Social Welfare Spending Reduce Inequality? New research says NO

NARRATIVE: Redistributive measures, such as social welfare spending, are necessary adjustments to “fix” wealth inequality.

REALITY: Politicians and pundits often advocate for policies to “fix” a supposed ill. More often than not, these policies are supported without consideration for the unseen, unintended effects. (more…)